Bloodborne Pathogens (2 hrs) Online

$60.00

This bloodborne pathogens course is ideal for workers who are expected to make direct or indirect contact with blood and other infectious materials. All such employees are obligated to complete a coursework and certification in bloodborne pathogens – as well as other potentially infectious materials (OPIM).

The Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) has strict rules in effect to help protect the health and safety of everyday workers in various sectors. CHC Training is proud to offer a comprehensive Bloodborne Pathogens Certification course, which teaches workers how to exercise precautions for preventing the transmission of bloodborne pathogens. Students will also learn how to identify risk factors and treatment options if unwarranted contact was made.

The types of employees that need special certification and training in Bloodborne Pathogens include:

•         First aid rescuers – including paramedics and EMTs

•         Health care professionals – including physicians, dentists, and nurses

•         Lab technicians – who handle bodily fluids every workday

•         Janitorial staff – responsible for cleaning medically hazardous waste

2x Bloodborne Pathogens (ONLINE)

$60.00

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Please complete registration for each attendee as follows:

Your Registration

Your Course Registration

Name as you'd like it to appear on the certificate. (Double-check for accuracy)
The student should have their own unique email address.

You will receive a Digital Certificate upon course completion. Additional certificate options available include:

Wallet Card Option:
Course access is 30 Days. You can get 30 more days of access for $10.

First Attendee

First Attendee Registration

Name as you'd like it to appear on the certificate. (Double-check for accuracy)
The student should have their own unique email address.

You will receive a Digital Certificate upon course completion. Additional certificate options available include:

Wallet Card Option:
Course access is 30 Days. You can get 30 more days of access for $10.

Second Attendee

Second Attendee Registration

Name as you'd like it to appear on the certificate. (Double-check for accuracy)
The student should have their own unique email address.

You will receive a Digital Certificate upon course completion. Additional certificate options available include:

Wallet Card Option:
Course access is 30 Days. You can get 30 more days of access for $10.

Third Attendee

Third Attendee Registration

Name as you'd like it to appear on the certificate. (Double-check for accuracy)
The student should have their own unique email address.

You will receive a Digital Certificate upon course completion. Additional certificate options available include:

You will receive a Digital Certificate upon course completion. Additional certificate options available include:
Course access is 30 Days. You can get 30 more days of access for $10.

Fourth Attendee

Fourth Attendee Registration

Name as you'd like it to appear on the certificate. (Double-check for accuracy)
The student should have their own unique email address.

You will receive a Digital Certificate upon course completion. Additional certificate options available include:

Wallet Card Option:
Course access is 30 Days. You can get 30 more days of access for $10.

Fifth Attendee

Fifth Attendee Registration

Name as you'd like it to appear on the certificate. (Double-check for accuracy)
The student should have their own unique email address.

You will receive a Digital Certificate upon course completion. Additional certificate options available include:

Wallet Card Option:
Course access is 30 Days. You can get 30 more days of access for $10.

Sixth Attendee

Sixth Attendee Registration

Name as you'd like it to appear on the certificate. (Double-check for accuracy)
The student should have their own unique email address.

You will receive a Digital Certificate upon course completion. Additional certificate options available include:

Wallet Card Option:
Course access is 30 Days. You can get 30 more days of access for $10.

Seventh Attendee

Seventh Attendee Registration

Name as you'd like it to appear on the certificate. (Double-check for accuracy)
The student should have their own unique email address.

You will receive a Digital Certificate upon course completion. Additional certificate options available include:

Wallet Card Option:
Course access is 30 Days. You can get 30 more days of access for $10.

Eighth Attendee

Eighth Attendee Registration

Name as you'd like it to appear on the certificate. (Double-check for accuracy)
The student should have their own unique email address.

You will receive a Digital Certificate upon course completion. Additional certificate options available include:

Wallet Card Option:
Course access is 30 Days. You can get 30 more days of access for $10.

Ninth Attendee

Ninth Attendee Registration

Name as you'd like it to appear on the certificate. (Double-check for accuracy)
The student should have their own unique email address.

You will receive a Digital Certificate upon course completion. Additional certificate options available include:

Wallet Card Option:
Course access is 30 Days. You can get 30 more days of access for $10.

Tenth Attendee

Tenth Attendee Registration

Name as you'd like it to appear on the certificate. (Double-check for accuracy)
The student should have their own unique email address.

You will receive a Digital Certificate upon course completion. Additional certificate options available include:

Wallet Card Option:
Course access is 30 Days. You can get 30 more days of access for $10.

Fees

Fees

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Description

As per OSHA 1910.1030(g)(2)(i) – Anyone who has occupational exposure to blood or other potentially infectious materials such as human body fluids, unfixed tissue or organ from a human, or HIV/HBV-containing culture mediums, needs to be trained on bloodborne pathogens annually. This course satisfies OSHA’s requirement.

First Aid/CPR/AED

A1. The standard applies to all employees who have occupational exposure to blood or other potentially infectious materials (OPIM).

  • Occupational exposure is defined as reasonably anticipated skin, eye, mucous membrane, or parenteral contact with blood or other potentially infectious materials that may result from the performance of an employee’s duties.
  • Blood is defined as human blood, human blood components, and products made from human blood.
  • Other potentially infectious materials is defined as the following: saliva in dental procedures; semen; vaginal secretions; cerebrospinal, synovial, pleural, pericardial, peritoneal, and amniotic fluids; body fluids visibly contaminated with blood; along with all body fluids in situations where it is difficult or impossible to differentiate between body fluids; unfixed human tissues or organs (other than intact skin); HIV-containing cell or tissue cultures, organ cultures, and HIV- or HBV-containing culture media or other solutions; and blood, organs, or other tissues from experimental animals infected with HIV or HBV.

A2. The standard does not apply to agriculture or construction. The standard applies to ship repairing, shipbuilding and shipbreaking and on commercial fishing vessels and other vessels where OSHA has jurisdiction, but not in longshoring and marine terminals. However, the General Duty Clause (Section 5(a)(1) of the OSH Act) will be used, where appropriate, to protect employees from bloodborne hazards in construction, longshoring, marine terminals and agriculture.

A3. Volunteers are not covered by the standard. Students are covered if they are compensated.

A4. Physicians employed by professional corporations are considered employees of that corporation. The corporation which employs these physicians may be cited by OSHA for violations affecting those physicians. The hospital where the physician practices may also be held responsible as the employer who created or controlled the hazard. Physicians who are sole practitioners or partners are not considered employees under the OSH Act; therefore, they are not covered by the protections of the standard. However, if a physician not employed by a hospital were to create a hazard to which hospital employees were exposed, it would be consistent with current OSHA policy to cite the hospital, the employer of the exposed employees, for failure to provide the protections of the Bloodborne Pathogens standard.

A5. OSHA considers personnel providers, who send their own employees to work at other facilities, to be employers whose employees may be exposed to hazards. Because your company maintains a continuing relationship with its employees, but another employer (your client) creates and controls the hazard, there is a shared responsibility for assuring that your employees are protected from workplace hazards. The client employer has the primary responsibility for such protection, but the “lessor employer” likewise has a responsibility under the Occupational Safety and Health Act. In the context of OSHA’s standard on Bloodborne Pathogens, 29 CFR 1910.1030, your company would be required, for example, to provide the general training outlined in the standard; ensure that employees are provided with the required vaccinations; and provide proper follow-up evaluations following an exposure incident. Your clients would be responsible, for example, for providing site-specific training and personal protective equipment, and would have the primary responsibility regarding the control of potential exposure conditions. The client, of course, may specify what qualifications are required for supplied personnel, including vaccination status. It is certainly in the interest of the lessor employer to ensure that all steps required under the standard have been taken by the client employer to ensure a safe and healthful workplace for the leased employees. Toward that end, your contracts with your clients should clearly describe the responsibilities of both parties in order to ensure that all requirements of the standard are met.

A6. Yes. If employees are trained and designated as responsible for rendering first aid as part of their job duties, they are covered by the protections of the standard. However, OSHA will consider it a de minimis violation – a technical violation carrying no penalties – if employees, who administer first aid as a collateral duty to their routine work assignments, are not offered the pre-exposure hepatitis B vaccination, provided that a number of conditions are met. In these circumstances, no citations will be issued.

The de minimis classification for failure to offer hepatitis B vaccination in advance of exposure does not apply to personnel who provide first aid at a first-aid station, clinic, or dispensary, or to the healthcare, emergency response or public safety personnel expected to render first aid in the course of their work. The de minimis classification is limited to persons who render first aid only as a collateral duty, responding solely to injuries resulting from workplace incidents, generally at the location where the incident occurred. To merit the de minimis classification, the following conditions also must be met:

  • Reporting procedures must be in place under the exposure control plan to ensure that all first-aid incidents involving the presence of blood or OPIM are reported to the employer before the end of the work shift during which the incident occurs.
  • Reports of first-aid incidents must include the names of all first-aid providers who rendered assistance and a description of the circumstances of the accident, including date and time, as well as a determination of whether an exposure incident, as defined in the standard, has occurred.
  • A report that lists all such first-aid incidents must be readily available to all employees and provided to OSHA upon request.
  • First-aid providers must receive training under the Bloodborne Pathogens standard that covers the specifics of the reporting procedures.
  • All first-aid providers who render assistance in any situation involving the presence of blood or other potentially infectious materials, regardless of whether or not a specific exposure occurs, must have the vaccine made available to them as soon as possible but in no event later than 24 hours after the exposure incident. If an exposure incident as defined in the standard has taken place, other post-exposure follow-up procedures must be initiated immediately, as per the requirements of the standard.

A7. Housekeeping workers in healthcare facilities may have occupational exposure, as defined by the standard. Individuals who perform housekeeping duties, particularly in-patient care and laboratory areas, may perform tasks, such as cleaning blood spills and handling regulated wastes, which cause occupational exposure.

While OSHA does not generally consider all maintenance personnel and janitorial staff employed in non-healthcare facilities to have occupational exposure, it is the employer’s responsibility to determine which job classifications or specific tasks and procedures involve occupational exposure. For example, OSHA expects products such as discarded sanitary napkins to be discarded into waste containers which are lined in such a way as to prevent contact with the contents. At the same time, the employer must determine if employees can come into contact with blood during the normal handling of such products from initial pick-up through disposal in the outgoing trash. If OSHA determines, on a case-by-case basis, that sufficient evidence of reasonably anticipated exposure exists, the employer will be held responsible for providing the protections of 29 CFR 1910.1030 to the employees with occupational exposure.

A70. All employees with occupational exposure must receive initial and annual training. In addition, training must be provided when changes (e.g., modified/new tasks or procedures) affect a worker’s occupational exposure.

A71. Part-time and temporary employees are covered and are also to be trained on company time.

A72. OSHA considers personnel providers, who send their own employees to work at other facilities, to be employers whose employees may be exposed to hazards. Because personnel providers maintain a continuing relationship with their employees, but another employer (your client) creates and controls the hazard, there is a shared responsibility for assuring that your employees are protected from workplace hazards. The client employer has the primary responsibility for such protection, but the “lessor employer” likewise has a responsibility under the Occupational Safety and Health Act.

In the context of OSHA’s standard on Bloodborne Pathogens, the personnel provider would be required to provide the general training outlined in the standard and the client employer would be responsible for providing site-specific training.

The contract between the personnel provider and the client should clearly describe the training responsibilities of both parties in order to ensure that all training requirements of the standard are met.

A73. The person conducting the training is required to be knowledgeable in the subject matter covered by the elements in the training program and be familiar with how the course topics apply to the workplace that the training will address. The trainer must demonstrate expertise in the area of occupational hazards of bloodborne pathogens.

A80. Training records must be retained for 3 years from the training date.