What are the EPA and state-specific license requirements for working in the asbestos and lead (abatement and testing) industry?

Elizabeth Graham Leave a Comment

It is important to distinguish the difference between certification and licensure. Certification is received after attending one of our classes and is specific to the individual who completed the class requirements. Certifications carry certain requirements and in most cases expire after a specified period set by the regulating agency. Licensure on the other hand is obtained post-certification and training, and is commonly issued by a federal or local regulating agency. Training providers, such as CHC Training issue certificates and do not issue licenses. Certification, training, and in some cases field experience and additional education are required to obtain individual licensure. It may be necessary to obtain both individual licenses (assigned to a student) and company license (assigned to an organization). In many cases, you may notice that during the class registration process, we ask location based information. This is to verify our compliance with the notification requirements specified by each of our federal and local accreditations.  

Asbestos: The EPA pushed the administration and enforcement of licensing out to each state individually in the 90’s. At that point, each state either elected to add a more-stringent individual and/or company licensing requirement or to forgo such. What this means is that states may or may not have requirements for individuals and/or companies to obtain a license post training, to be able to perform such activities in their state. Additionally, some counties enacted additional licensing requirements. In some cases, states will accept training certifications issued by non-state approved training providers through EPA Reciprocity, or they may not have state-specific licensing requirements. AHERA training is ALWAYS required to conduct asbestos-related activities. Therefore, it is important to check with your local agencies to verify the requirements.

Lead:  The EPA pushed the option of the administration and enforcement of licensing out to each state, and maintained enforcement over the states who did not create their own program. Currently, this includes AK, AZ, FL, ID, MT, NV, NM, NY, SC, SD and WY – where post-training students must obtain EPA-licensure to perform lead abatement and/or evaluation activities. Besides these states, each state either elected to add a more-stringent individual and/or company licensing requirement or to administer the EPA’s original requirements on their state level. What this means is that states not under EPA-administration may or may not have requirements for individuals and/or companies to obtain a license post training, to be able to perform such activities in their state. Additionally, some counties enacted additional licensing requirements. Therefore, it is important to check with your local agencies to verify the requirements.

CHC Training works diligently to maintain relationships with agencies on the local and federal level to ensure our classes maintain full compliance and we ensure that if we list a state or agency as accepting a certificate from our company, it is only done so after a full verification has been completed. However, regulations are ever-changing, which is why we guarantee a full refund on course tuition, should we list acceptance in an area that later does not accept our certifications for a period of thirty (30) calendar days post certification issue date. Please verify certification applicability prior to registration.

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